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Do COVID-19 Patients Are Being Injected With A Microchip? Is it true?

 

COVID-19 Vaccination
Image via Reuters Twitter account

Do COVID-19 Patients Are Being Injected With A Microchip? Is it true?

Many have heard from relatives and colleagues about the theory of a "microchip" conspiracy. They can even believe it themselves or any version of it.

None of the COVID-19 vaccines in development contains software or microchips. They cannot be used to track people. Let's explore more below.

Goldberg, an author of “Enemies Within: The Culture of Conspiracy in Modern America”, and History Professor at the University of Utah has written:

The microchip theory could have also come as a result of a misunderstanding.

“There are chips on the outside of the syringes used to distribute the vaccine that’s under the label, and these chips are supposed to track vaccine use,” he says.

Robert Goldberg, also says:

“We had no problem whatsoever because there was an absolute faith that science was doing good, but I think over the last 50 years there’s been a decided change in that,”

Conspiracy theories surrounding COVID-19, especially the COVID-19 vaccine, are confirming Goldberg’s hypothesis.

According to conspiracy theory, microchips are transmitted from the Covid-19 vaccine to people's bodies and are being used to track them, but is it possible?

James Tabery is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Utah says:

"The theory of microchip conspiracy is likely to come from misstating the Information of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and their huge investment in the efforts of the Worldwide Covid-19 vaccination."

Tabery also said:

“Logistical challenge: how do you keep track of who’s been vaccinated when you don’t have the electronic infrastructure to do that?”

Tabery adds that with COVID-19, we hear about conspiracy theories surrounding 5G towers, Anthony Fauci, Bill Gates, and George Soros.

He says MIT researchers considered using an invisible colour to keep track of vaccinators. They say that one can either shine the light under the line or use a smartphone app to see if the ink is in your skin.

However, Tabrey says the idea has never been found before animal testing.

“You sort of mash those two things together and sprinkle some paranoia and you get Bill Gates wants to microchip everyone,” he tells ABC4.

According to his point of view, millions of people are vaccinated now, and if they want to test this theory, they can get the whole body scan done.

Apijeckt's website shows the body structure of the syringe, which can include an NFC chip under the drug label on the syringe. 

This chip is purely to track vaccine use, not to track people who have obtained the vaccine.

Jenny Johnson, Public Information Officer for the Utah Department of Health, says:

“Rumors and disinformation like this are extremely dangerous. We know exactly what is included in the vaccines. Anyone can find that information on the FDA website as well. We have the ingredients of each vaccine listed here,”.

Johnson also says:

“The COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Please seek out credible sources of information to make your decisions about the vaccines.”

Goldberg says that people like Bill Gates and George Soros may be seen by some as “puppet masters” and fear that a global elite is seeking to control us to gain power and wealth. He says this has happened historically as well.

How Do Conspiracy Theories Form?

According to Tabery, conspiracy theories can impose a sense of order.

“The world is a chaotic place. There’s a lot of strange, unpredictable, awful things that happen from tsunamis that kill a quarter of a million people to pandemics that kill more,”.

He also says. “Oftentimes conspiracy theories are about making the chaotic world seem less chaotic.”

Tabery acknowledges that conspiracy theories have appeared not just regarding the vaccine but with subjects like mask-wearing, social distancing, etc.

Goldberg says lack of trust is the main factor in the formation of conspiracy theories.

“This is not simply a lunatic fringe. This is not simply the extreme. What has happened is conspiracy thinking has breached the mainstream. It’s left the banks and is now in the mainstream of American thought and opinion, and that’s what the concern is.”

To display this point, Goldberg cited a Gallup Poll. He says that in 1985, 75% of Americans said they trust the government to do what is right all or most of the time. Currently, only 17% of Americans trust the government to do what is right all or most of the time.

“I think there is a profound distrust of American institutions and the medical profession and medicine in general and science. I think the idea that we have- we’re going to trust science and science will protect us- is being turned on its head by people who distrust those kinds of authorities and institutions and trust those who are naysayers and who seek to discredit all of our institutions.”

Goldberg also said:

“What these conspiracy theories do is they create a world of good versus evil, or right versus wrong, and if people believe that everybody is opposed to you or disagrees with you, is a traitor, has betrayed the trust, then the very foundations of this country… is lost,” he explains. “And then we go into a future-facing very difficult problems without that ability to solve the problems that we’re going to be having to deal with.”

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